50 Shades of Influencer Pet Peeves

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This year is going to be a big year for social influencers. While social shopper marketing is a relatively new industry, social influencers can bring new audiences, build brand loyalty and create great content that gives context to a brand. Often, their audiences are bigger than the brands’ social following, and that makes them a useful resource for improving audience engagement. Brands are finally understanding the importance of including influencer marketing in the mix, but do they also understand what makes an influencer tick?

We asked our community of over 3,000 bloggers to share their top issues when working with brands– the response was overwhelming. Here are 50 suggestions to remember when working with an influencer.

Compensation Pet Peeves

Nathan Engels: WannaBite

1. I get turned off when brands only send product. Product doesn’t pay my mortgage so unless it’s $100-$200 product, a dishtowel isn’t going to cut it. I know very few people who work for free.

Cristi Comes: Motherhood Unadorned

2. [When a brand] Offers me a review of a product that they expect me to return after reviewing it with no other compensation.

Daily Baez: DailyCurlz

3. [Brands] Asking me to post about the great partnership with a huge celebrity, but they don’t have the budget to pay me.

Sara Merritt: Sara & Co.

4. [Brands] Asking me to write a blog post filled with links for a chance to win a small prize.

Staci Salazar: 7 On A Shoestring

5. Write about my product and have a chance to win it for yourself.

Beau Coffron: Lunchbox Dad
6. Offering “Exposure” in exchange for a blog post advertising a campaign, giveaway or special event.

Rachel Rockwell: Bubbly Nature Creations
7. No, I will not accept your “blog button award” to put into my sidebar with a link back to your website with no compensation. In what way has this benefited the blogger?

Anne-Marie Nichols: This Mama Cooks–On A Diet

8. An ambassadorship isn’t an affiliate program. Sure, I can be a paid ambassador for you and participate in your affiliate program in addition to that. But I won’t be an ambassador and only be paid in affiliate revenues. Ambassadorships don’t work like that!

David Dial: Spiced

9. I blog as a full time job, and unfortunately my bank does not accept cookies in lieu of a mortgage payment.

Amy Fulcher: As The Bunny Hops

10. My best work requires time. I’m happy to work on an expedited timeline, but I expect to be compensated for it.

Robyn Wright: RobynsOnlineWorld

11. Creating content is not the same as sharing content. There are different price points for these things.

Melissa Pezza: The Mommyhood Chronicles

12. Do not send press releases and expect us to post them for free.

Pitch Pet Peeves

Kelly Tomlinson: Texas Type A Mom

13. [Brands] Requesting I attend events in other cities when they’re hours away and then not offering accommodations. Texas is a big state. Asking me to drive 3 hours north to Dallas or 3 hours east to Houston is not going to happen unless it’s a good fit and you’re offering accommodations.

Nathan Engels: WannaBite

14. I get turned off on a generic pitch that’s 15 pages. I get 200 emails a day, pitch me like that, and you get a Gmail filter to invisibletown.

Danielle Simmons: Simmworks Family Blog

15. Asking for my sponsored post rate and then offering a fraction of it because they don’t think my stats are worth my rate.

Chris Lewis: Dad of Divas

16. Don’t make assumptions about Dads in general in your pitch.

Andrew Bennett: Ben Spark

17. Being addressed as a “Mommy Blogger.” I’m a man.

David Dial: Spiced

18. One of the most obvious warning signs is the blanket email for a PR firm, which starts off “Dear Blogger.” I usually delete those emails before reading past the first line.

Relationship Pet Peeves
Robyn Wright: RobynsOnlineWorld

19. Do not “follow up” with me if I have already replied with a no – check your emails for replies before you send out the 2nd, 3rd, gasp 4th follow up email to pitches.

20. Do not offer a “guest post” which is nothing more than an advertorial brands want posted for free.

Melissa Pezza: The Mommyhood Chronicles

21. Do not send generic pitch letters. We like to see more personal letters to us.

22. Do not harass the blogger if you have not heard in 24 hours. We are quite busy too so give us a day or two to respond.

Beau Coffron: Lunchbox Dad
23. [Brands] Asking for all the social media and blog post links to be emailed to them weeks later when the brand was tagged in the post. If they wanted them they should have paid closer attention.

Summer Davis: Dirty Floor Diaries

24. I’m completely turned off when I write or respond to a company, and they don’t even have the courtesy to write back and let me know where I stand.

Ellen Peppercorn: That Chic Mom

25. The lack of brand support is a big fail for everyone involved, brands should be promoting via social media the content they contract from us.

Stacie Connerty: The Divine Miss Mommy / Divine Lifestyle

26. Making me chase you down for payment. This happens a lot.

Cristi Comes: Motherhood Unadorned
27. [Brands] Does not treat me like a professional. I’m not sitting behind my computer just to get free stuff. This is my business and what I do has value.

Daily Baez: DailyCurlz

28. Put me in the position to compete with another blogger.

Tiffany Martel: Daily Leisure

29. Build relationship not one hit wonders: I love working with brands over and over. I love to build an ongoing relationship. I have about 10 brands I work with on a regular basis and I would do just about anything they need from me and it they would for me.

Amy Fulcher: As The Bunny Hops

30. I’d love to talk to you about how we can work together. If you don’t know how you’d like to work with bloggers, just ask a blogger for their ideas!

Stacie Connerty: The Divine Miss Mommy / Divine Lifestyle

31. [Brands] Asking me to go above and beyond which I do in the hopes of establishing a long-term relationship.

Michele McGraw: Scraps of My Geek Life

32. Send me a pitch, I respond and then never hear from them again.

Clueless on Influence Pet Peeves:

Summer Davis: Dirty Floor Diaries

33. Understanding the difference between traffic and influence. High traffic does not mean high influence. Low traffic doesn’t mean low influence. Quality of content usually determines things like that.

Nicole Brady: SAHM Reviews

34. Don’t get caught up in numbers. QUALITY is what counts most.

Carrie Wells: Huppie Mama

35. Be realistic about expectations. If you want a product review for an inexpensive product, do not expect a blog post with extensive social media shares.

Nathan Engels: WannaBite

36. I get annoyed when a brand doesn’t see the value in a blogger. When I post content for your Instagram, my stuff gets ten times the engagement yours does, there is value in influence.

Tiffany Martel: Daily Leisure

37. Numbers are not everything. I have 2 blogs: a big blog and a small blog according to the social media followers. Yet my small blog on average gets more page views. Both get traffic from different sources. Please look at the blogs and the interaction, number of shares on each post. Small blogs deserve just as much as a larger blog if the quality of work and the readers are the same. You can have a million social media followers without actual readers.
Not understanding blogging pet peeves:

Leanette Fernandez: Teach Me 2 Save

38. Ask that the link within the post be “follow” when it is supposed to be a “no follow” link.
Jacqueline Presley: Creative Outpour

39. [Brands] Asking me to include pre-scripted sections of blog posts with opinions I may or may not agree with.

Kris Cain: Little Tech Girl

40. Remember that you are not the only brand/PR pitching that blogger. If you send a product for review, do not expect that review to be posted in 3 days.

Stacie Connerty: The Divine Miss Mommy / Divine Lifestyle

41. [Brands] Making edits to the style of the piece and adding words that are not my own but trying to make it look like me.

Cristi Comes: Motherhood Unadorned
42. [When a brands] Asks for me not to disclose that a sponsored post is sponsored, which is against FCC regulations.

Michele McGraw: Scraps of My Geek Life

43. Sending me a pitch, but not telling me the brand until after I’ve agreed to work with them.

Sarah Mock: How I Pinch A Penny

44. We are just like you! We work, we photograph, we edit, we social share, we email, we conference call, we market. But often we do it with multiple kids at home. While we do all these tasks we are also wiping noses, finding lost toys, teaching life lessons, finding entertaining activities, feeding and loving our kids at the same time. Our office is just like yours. Just with kids.

Kristi Reddell: Moms Confession

45. Discuss advertising opportunities with a brand, only to have them take the idea you pitched back (as paid advertising) and use it as an idea to pitch other bloggers (that will publish without any advertising fees)

Rachel Rockwell: Bubbly Nature Creations
46. Link back. Always link back if featuring my photos and my work. Not only is annoying, but it is illegal not to do so.

Nathan Engels: WannaBite

47. I get annoyed when a brand sends interns to man a booth at a conference. I paid money to be there, at least send someone that matters.

Anne-Marie Nichols: This Mama Cooks–On A Diet

48. My biggest peeve is applications for brand ambassadorship that are run more like a contest than a job application.

Nicole Brady: SAHM Reviews

49. Be aware of what you are asking and seek an agreement that is win/win. Bloggers work hard to gain the trust of their readers. They spend hours curating content, taking/editing photos, sharing content across their social channels and more.

Jacqueline Presley: Creative Outpour

50. Not allowing for a non-commercial sounding title/angle.

Whew! A long list, but one that gives valuable insight into the mind of an influencer and her expectations. For influencers, what matters most is relationship building, treating them like you would like to be treated and fair compensation. But my reminder is listen to what influencers have to say—they know their brands and the audience they’ve built like the back of their hands.

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