Features

The Google Guillotine

Written on
Jan 28, 2011 
Author
Gail Gardner  |

guillotine_smallADOTAS – I can’t stop grinning about Gavin Dunaway’s truth-sharing post, “Google Stands Up For Its Search“; no doubt bloggers like us “are giving big G a headache.” I applaud him for having the courage to write the truth as he sees it. (There is only ever what truth we can each deduce which the many will never agree on.)

Big G intentionally created these problems with their MFA (made for AdSense) offering that I explained in my post about Google Killing the AdWords Golden Goose and their official Google AdSense© for Domains offering that pays big bucks to people who have littered the Internet with parked domains full of canned ads.

These tactics are what PPC (pay-per-click — i.e. AdWords and similar ads) experts call distribution fraud because advertisers can not opt out of them and a page full of canned searches is not a search and will not convert like a search. (If anyone can provide proof that these do convert I invite them to send it to me and I will publish it.)

Another “groan-inducing defense” that is getting old is the company that creates the problem claiming they are “fighting” the problem. Oh please.

Big G is trying to “clean up” the Internet to favor big brands and that has very serious implications for small local and e-commerce businesses and bloggers alike. I commented in this post on SEOBook by Aaron Wall regarding the now-famous Internet Cesspool quote on what I believe their CEO meant.

The Google MayDay update slammed e-commerce sites. The PageRank update that occurred over this past weekend G-slapped my blog for the first time. That is not surprising because I am firmly in the DoFollow, CommentLuv, KeywordLuv camp and am a champion of supporting small businesses. Because of that, my posts have a ton of outgoing links in the comments.

Allowing those links runs contrary to what Big G wants, but bloggers like me should hold fast to doing what is right and not what G wants because reversing this economic decline requires understanding that marketing is not evil — it is how we find what we want and need from non-big-brand companies.

That last link contains statistics that clearly show what is destroying economies around the world and what we — those of us who are willing to make better decisions — can do to reverse that. I encourage anyone reading this far to open that last link up and read those statistics so they clearly understand how dangerous not changing our shopping behavior is.

By moving the dollars we currently spend to small local and online businesses, we can create buying communities that may escape the worse of the inevitable collapse of the U.S. dollar. Anyone who believes that the economy can recover is in for a huge surprise. As many have been quoted as saying throughout time, “Those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it.”

The handwriting is on the wall and easily interpreted if we only look around and read the excellent information available on the Internet — much of it compiled in “What Caused the Great Depression is Now.”

The monopoly Google has on both organic and paid search — clearly seen in this spreadsheet of Google market share by country — gives them a guillotine over the heads of every business, blog and website owner. They are also behind serious threats to net neutrality that could further favor those with deep pockets and cripple independent websites of all kind.

We Internet users have collectively handed them this guillotine and only we — by using alternative search engines — can take it away from them.





Author Photo

Gail Gardner is a Social Media Marketing and Internet Strategist at GrowMap.com. Follow her on Twitter here.

Reader Comments.

Domain traffic actually converts at a much higher rate than Google.com organic search traffic. I’ll cite some sources when I am not on my phone.

Posted by Roy Barrett | 2:09 pm on January 28, 2011.

I think smaller, local businesses are definitely on the rise and it’s only a small amount of time before they really take over.

I think google is already losing some control with facebook places and yelp and foursquare.

Posted by Brandon Yanofsky | 5:04 pm on January 28, 2011.

I agree with Brandon on yelp and foursquare. They allow local businesses an opportunity to be seen. For example, I was on Facebook the other night and saw an ad for Rottler, I clicked on it only to discover it was for the local Rottler company in my town. It was instant. I doubt that Google can quickly come up with a solution to that.

Posted by Teasastips | 10:03 am on January 29, 2011.

Trying to support smaller business is the way to go. Because when we buy from big corporate firms we are actually fueling the fortune of only a few, that are already getting money from million others. But by buying from small business you are practically helping yourself, because those small business are your neighbors, friends and people who will invest the money back, they will not just gobble up the money like a big corporate giant!

Posted by Alex | 4:25 pm on January 29, 2011.

I really admire the fact that you stand up for doing what is right and assisting small businesses. It really annoys me when I see good websites getting slapped. If only the bad ones were slapped it wouldn’t be unfair.
The other thing that I have found is that Facebook is really growing and leveraging the power of Facebook is the way to go right now. If we focus on marketing and not putting all of our eggs in the “Google basket” we will have more chances to withstand whatever changes they make in their algorithm. Loved the resources provided in this article.
All the best,
Eren

Posted by Eren Mckay | 1:55 am on January 30, 2011.

Viva la resistance. Seriously though.I don’t see any other search engine doing the job. How can we fight this?

Posted by Ivin | 3:18 am on January 31, 2011.

Thanks to everyone who commented so far. Here are my thoughts on what you’ve shared:

@Roy I look forward to seeing your sources and specifically what converts on parked domains versus search. For small businesses I do not like to see their ads on canned searches because those are NOT true searches.

Unless Google allows us to opt out of that type of distribution or ideally only opt in to specific sites (not opt out) the only thing advertisers can do is stop bidding on the keywords that are overspending and not converting.

That said, IMHO, parked domains full of ads are a waste of prime domain names that could be better used for quality content instead. If the purpose of something is solely to generate income and provide nothing of worth to others I do not condone it.

While some may think a page full of ads provides value I disagree.

@Brandon I sincerely wish that were true, but all you have to do is open your eyes to who Google and Facebook favor and know that they control these sites to know that they can slam the door on small businesses at will – or use their preferred method of taking their money and putting them under – much less messy from a PR perspective.

We must keep in mind that many “alternatives” are controlled by the same people. Yelp and Merchant Circle have both been outed for trying to extort money from small businesses. Hopefully bad publicity may keep that type of behavior in check. Positive reviews are a challenge for any business to obtain so any site that makes good reviews disappear or features bad ones is bad for small business.

When businesses act in an evil way, honest alternatives will spring up but we must seek them out because they will not have the power of the media behind them. We have to collectively locate and support them for them to stay viable.

@Alex Your comment is very similar to a post I wrote on the importance of Word of Mouth Marketing that shows the actual statistics on who has the money. Here are two quotes from that post:

“The chasm between America’s haves and have-nots has reached Grand Canyon-esque proportions. Thirty years ago top executives at S&P 500 companies made an average of 30 times what their workers did — now they make 300 times what their workers make.”

“Income inequality now is at an all-time high: The top 1 percent of Americans earn a quarter of all income, and the top 10 percent earn 50 percent.”

@eren I agree that Facebook is growing in importance and have been forcing myself to use it in spite of the serious usability issues it has. We must bear in mind though that like Google, Facebook is controlled by the same few elite and is a great way to lose a ton of money. Those who intend to take their chances in either need to make sure they know what they’re doing. It is far too easy to throw money away on both.

Hi Ivin,

The media is not going to promote competition to their golden choices so it is up to us to seek out alternative search engines. There are tons of alternatives. I’ll research them and publish a post either on Adotas or my own blog about them later this week.

There is more discussion about this post on my blog in the post announcing its publication and I will continue to answer comments both places.

Posted by Gail Gardner | 2:36 pm on January 31, 2011.

I agree with Alex (above). I’ve tried using other search engines, but I’m hooked. Force of habit.

Posted by sheila | 7:12 pm on January 31, 2011.

I also agree with Alex, if we support the small businesses out there is like we’re helping ourselves to grow.

Posted by Barbie Clothes | 7:11 am on February 2, 2011.

I did respond to these comments but that comment never appeared live. Perhaps it is still caught in moderation.

Posted by Gail Gardner | 8:35 pm on February 7, 2011.

I really don’t understand Big G sometimes.

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